4 May 2012

WIENERSCHNITZEL or not WIENERSCHNITZEL...

WIENER SCHNITZEL
Wiener Schnitzel is a traditional Austrian dish - well there is a debate if it originated in Vienna or Milan, but it has definitely been adopted in Austria as one of the main national dishes since many centuries. It is made from veal escalopes dipped in flour, egg and bread crumbs and fried in butter, lard or oil. I made mine with pork, and apparently for this reason I am no longer legally allowed to call it 'Wiener Schnitzel', but the official name should be 'Wiener Schnitzel vom Schwein, or 'Wienerschnitzel from Pork'  :-)  Fair enough about the name, but whatever it's called, it is so delicious and makes me feel like home. I tend to use pork as it's more tasty and also less expensive - having said that sometimes I make the Schnitzels from pork fillet, a little more expensive, but they are just so tender. Although it should be served immediately after frying, we like it also warmed, or even
cold on the next day, and some like them tucked between slices of bread to make a 'Schnitzelbrot'. Wiener Schnitzel is traditionally served in Austria with Potato salad, lambs lettuce, and lemon wedges. I like mine best like my mum makes them: with rice (cooked and perfumed with onions spiked with cloves), lambs lettuce, and a little cranberry jam. 

Source: My Mum's
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Makes 4 portions
600g pork schnitzel (escalopes) or pork loin chops
salt
lemon
flour
bread crumbs (or 'Semmelbrösel': ideally crumbs made from white bread rolls)
2 eggs
Oil or lard for frying (should be fat with hot smoking point)
additional lemons for garnish


Place each Schnitzel one after the other between 2 sheets of plastic foil then pound with a meat hammer or rolling pin to a thickness of app. 6 mm. Remove from the foil. With a sharp knife make several 2mm cuts along the edges of the Schnitzel so that the Schnitzel does not roll up later during frying. Season with salt on both sides and sprinkle a little lemon juice over. Rub both into the meat. Prepare a plate with flour and another with breadcrumbs. In the third break the 2 eggs, add a pinch of salt and beat lightly - not like me as in the picture, until you have lots of bubbles... ;-)
WIENERSCHNITZEL
Place a Schnitzel into the flour, making sure the Schnitzel is fully dusted. Shake off any excess flour, then put it into the egg, again making sure the Schnitzel is fully covered. Let any excess egg run off and finally put it into the breadcrumbs, pressing the crumbs on very  gently. Repeat with the other Schnitzels until all are breaded. 
WIENERSCHNITZEL
Heat a frying pan over medium-high heat and melt the lard or heat the oil. There should be just enough fat so that the Schnitzels will just about swim in the fat - this way the Schnitzels will actually magically absorb less fat than when fried in little oil and sitting on the bottom of the pan. Put the Schnitzels in batches into the pan, making sure not to overcrowd the pan. Cook for a couple of minutes until golden brown, then turn and cook for another couple of minutes, depending on the thickness of the meat. While frying, shake the pan forwards and backwards a bit. Do not turn the Schnitzels more than once. If cooked correctly, the bread crust = Panade should form wrinkles. It should also not be tightly attached to the meat, ideally it should be possible to slide a knife between the meat and the 'Panade' once fried. Put the finished Schnitzels on kitchen paper to absorb most of the fat and keep warm in the oven until all Schnitzels are fried if necessary. Serve with lemon wedges. 
WIENER SCHNITZEL

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WIENERSCHNITZEL or not WIENERSCHNITZEL...      



Wiener Schnitzel

Serves 4

600g pork schnitzel (escalopes) or pork loin chops
salt
lemon
flour
bread crumbs (or 'Semmelbrösel': ideally crumbs made from white bread rolls)
2 eggs
Oil or lard for frying (should be fat with hot smoking point)
additional lemons for garnish

Place each Schnitzel one after the other between 2 sheets of plastic foil then pound with a meat hammer or rolling pin to a thickness of app. 6 mm. Remove from the foil. With a sharp knife make several 2mm cuts along the edges of the Schnitzel so that the Schnitzel does not roll up later during frying. Season with salt on both sides and sprinkle a little lemon juice over. Rub both into the meat. Prepare a plate with flour and another with breadcrumbs. In the third break the 2 eggs, add a pinch of salt and beat lightly. Place a Schnitzel into the flour, making sure the Schnitzel is fully dusted. Shake off any excess flour, then put it into the egg, again making sure the Schnitzel is fully covered. Let any excess egg run off and finally put it into the breadcrumbs, pressing the crumbs on very  gently. Repeat with the other Schnitzels until all are breaded. Heat a frying pan over medium-high heat and melt the lard or heat the oil. There should be just enough fat so that the Schnitzels will just about swim in the fat - this way the Schnitzels will actually magically absorb less fat than when fried in little oil and sitting on the bottom of the pan. Put the Schnitzels in batches into the pan, making sure not to overcrowd the pan. Cook for a couple of minutes until golden brown, then turn and cook for another couple of minutes, depending on the thickness of the meat. While frying, shake the pan forwards and backwards a bit. Do not turn the Schnitzels more than once. If cooked correctly, the bread crust = Panade should form wrinkles. It should also not be tightly attached to the meat, ideally it should be possible to slide a knife between the meat and the 'Panade' once fried. Put the finished Schnitzels on kitchen paper to absorb most of the fat and keep warm in the oven until all Schnitzels are fried if necessary. Serve with lemon wedges. 
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